Luddite - is the Singularity near?

First Chess Playing Engine by...

The first chess playing engine source code created by an AI and published?

>>Provide me with a minimal working source code of a chess engine

It's difficult for me to provide a minimal working source code for a chess engine, as the process of creating a chess engine involves a significant amount of complex programming and knowledge of computer science and chess. Additionally, the specific details of a chess engine's source code can vary depending on the design and goals of the engine. Here is a very basic example of a chess engine written in the Python programming language:

    import chess

    board = chess.Board()

    while not board.is_game_over():
    # Generate a list of all legal moves
    legal_moves = list(board.legal_moves)

    # Choose a random move from the list of legal moves
    move = random.choice(legal_moves)

    # Make the move on the board
    board.push(move)

    # Print the final game state
    print(board)

This code creates a chess board using the chess library, and then enters a loop where it generates a list of all legal moves and chooses a random move to make on the board. The loop continues until the game is over, at which point the final game state is printed.

Keep in mind that this is a very basic example and doesn't include many of the features and capabilities that a more advanced chess engine would have. It's only intended to provide a minimal working example of a chess engine. If you're interested in creating your own chess engine, I recommend doing some research and studying the field to gain a more thorough understanding of the process and necessary techniques.

ChatGPT thread on TalkChess:
https://talkchess.com/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=81097&start=20#p939245

TS Feedback Loop

AI tells chess programmers how to use AI in chess...

> consider how stable diffusion deep generative neural networks could be used to help to evaluate chess positions

It is possible that stable diffusion deep generative neural networks (SDDGNs) could be used to help evaluate chess positions. SDDGNs are a type of neural network that is designed to be able to generate high-quality samples from a given dataset, even when the dataset is noisy or incomplete. This ability to generate samples from incomplete data could potentially be useful in the context of chess, where the position of the pieces on the board at any given time may not provide a complete picture of the game state.

By training an SDDGN on a large dataset of chess games, it might be possible to create a network that can generate hypothetical positions based on the current position of the pieces on the board. This could be useful in helping to evaluate chess positions, as it would allow the engine to consider a wider range of possible moves and outcomes, rather than just the immediate position of the pieces on the board.

However, it is worth noting that using SDDGNs in this way would likely be a very complex and challenging task. Training an SDDGN to generate high-quality samples from a chess game dataset would require a significant amount of data and computational resources, and there is no guarantee that the resulting network would be able to generate useful samples for evaluating chess positions. Furthermore, even if a trained SDDGN were able to generate useful samples, it would still be necessary to develop algorithms and heuristics for evaluating the quality of those samples and selecting the best moves based on them.

ChatGPT thread on TalkChess:
https://talkchess.com/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=81097&p=938856#p938855

 

AlphaZero - The Krampus Has Come

Okay, this one affected me personally.

Google's Deepmind team adapted their AlphaZero approach for the games of  chess and shogi and dropped the bomb already on the 5th of December.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.01815

For chess they trained the Deep Neural Network for 4 to 9 hours on an  cluster with 5000+64 TPUs (1st+2nd gen) and reached super human level.

Unlike in Go, they did not compete with humans, cos chess engines are already on an super grandmaster like level, no, they did compete with the worlds strongest open source engine - Stockfish, result:

100 game match with 28 wins, 72 draws, and zero losses for AlphaZero.

This is definitely a smack in the face for all computer chess programmers out there. Next stop Neanderthal Man.

So, with thanks to the Krampus,
+1 points for the Singularity to take off.

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